Byron and the Cause of Greek Independence

Byron and the Cause of Greek Independence: Reflections upon an unpublished letter of Byron, recently acquired through the Library Associates

WM. H. McCARTHY JR.The Yale University Library GazetteVol. 8, No. 3 (JANUARY 1934), pp. 100-104 (5 pages)Published By: Yale University

The Yale University Library Gazette
Page 100 of

https://www.jstor.org/stable/40856860?seq=1

French Images from the Greek War of Independence 1821-1830: Art and Politics under the Restoration by Nina M. Athanassoglou-Kallmyer

Review: [Untitled]

Reviewed Work: French Images from the Greek War of Independence 1821-1830: Art and Politics under the Restoration by Nina M. Athanassoglou-KallmyerReview by: Michael Paul DriskelThe Art BulletinVol. 74, No. 2 (Jun., 1992), pp. 339-341 (3 pages)Published By: CAA

The Art Bulletin
Page 339 of

https://www.jstor.org/stable/3045878?seq=1

The Greek Fire: American-Ottoman Relations and Democratic Fervor in the Age of Revolutions

James Monroe and the 1821 Greek revolution

The Greek Fire: American-Ottoman Relations and Democratic Fervor in the Age of Revolutions

Maureen Connors Santelli

Cornell University Press

The Greek Fire
Εικόνα

https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctvw1d772

Une guerre d’indépendance qui déchaîna les passions – «Nous sommes tous des Grecs»

Une guerre d’indépendance qui déchaîna les passions «Nous sommes tous des Grecs»

Εικόνα

https://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/2021/03/DUMOULIN/62876

The End of History and the Last Map – FOREIGN POLICY

Cartography and conflict in the post-Cold War world.

‘The challenges of mapping global peace and prosperity were already evident 75 years ago, when Americans began to articulate a new liberal internationalist vision for the future. The end of World War II, like the end of the Cold War, led some to imagine that the world was entering an unprecedented era of international peace. Earnest optimism about this postwar world took particularly fanciful form in two striking—yet strikingly unrealistic—maps. The first is the cartographer Leslie Macdonald Gill’s 1942 map of the Atlantic Charter, which visualized U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill’s promise for the peace that would follow an Allied victory. Rays of sun shine down on a world engaged in commerce and industry while a man in the corner hammers artillery into ploughshares. Borders between countries are still demarcated but only barely, with dotted lines that disappear under all the bustle’

The End of History and the Last Map